Development

Step outline – A step outline (more commonly called a beat sheet) is a detailed telling of a story with the intention of turning the story into a screenplay for a motion picture.

Film treatment – A film treatment (or simply treatment) is a piece of prose, typically the step between scene cards (index cards) and the first draft of a screenplay for a motion picture, television program, or radio play. It is generally longer and more detailed than an outline (or one-page synopsis), and it may include details of directorial style that an outline omits. Treatments read like a short story, but are told in the present tense and describe events as they happen. A treatment may also be created in the process of adapting a novel, play, or other pre-existing work into a screenplay.

Scriptment – A scriptment is a written work by a movie or television screenwriter that combines elements of a script and treatment, especially the dialogue elements, which are formatted the same as in a screenplay.

Screenplay – A screenplay, or script, is a written work by screenwriters for a film, television show, or video game (as opposed to a stage play). Screenplays can be original works or adaptations from existing pieces of writing. A screenplay is a form of narration in which the movements, actions, expressions and dialogue of the characters are described in a certain format. Visual or cinematographic cues may be given, as well as scene descriptions and scene changes.

Film finance – Film finance is an aspect of film production that occurs during the development stage prior to pre-production, and is concerned with determining the potential value of a proposed film.

Film budgeting – Film budgeting refers to the process by which a line producer, unit production manager, or production accountant prepares a budget for a film production. This document is used to secure financing for and lead to pre-production and production of the film. Multiple drafts of the budget may be required to whittle down costs. A budget is typically divided into four sections: above the line (creative talent), belw the line (direct production costs), post-production (editing, visual effects, etc.), and other (insurance, completion bond, etc.). The budget excludes film promotion and marketing, which is the responsibility of the film distributor.

Green-light – To green-light is to give permission to proceed with a project.

Pre-production

Breaking down the script/Script breakdown – A script breakdown is an intermediate step in the production of a film.

Storyboard – A storyboard is a graphic organizer that consists of illustrations or images displayed in sequence for the purpose of pre-visualizing a motion picture, animation, motion graphic or interactive media sequence.

Production board/Production strip – A traditional production board, stripboard, or production strip is a filmmaking term for a cardboard or wooden chart displaying color-coded strips of paper, each containing information about a scene in the film’s shooting script. The strips can then be rearranged and laid out sequentially to represent the order one wants to film in, providing a schedule that can be used to plan the production. This is done because most films are shot “out of sequence,” meaning that they do not necessarily begin with the first scene and end with the last. For logistical purposes, scenes are often grouped by talent or location and are arranged to accommodate the schedules of cast and crew.

Day Out of Days – The Day Out of Days is a chart used by filmmakers to tally the number of paid days for each cast member. The chart must be prepared after the shooting schedule. Once it has been completed, work can begin on a budget. The Day Out of Days is arranged as a grid, with columns representing days and rows representing cast members. Letters are used to indicate paid days. Typically, W is used to indicate a work day (the cast member will perform on that day), T indicates a travel day, and R a rehearsal day. All three count as paid days. The letters S (Start) and F (Finish) are used to indicate the first and last paid days. For example, a cast member’s first paid day (usually a rehearsal day) appears as SR; the last paid day (usually a work day) appears as WF.

Production

Cinematography – Cinematography is the art of motion picture (and more recently, electronic video camera) photography. Cinematographers use a lens to focus reflected light from objects into a real image that is transferred to some image sensor or light-sensitive material inside movie camera. These exposures are created sequentially and preserved for later processing and viewing as a motion picture. Capturing images with an electronic image sensor produces an electrical charge for each pixel in the image, which is electronically processed and stored in a video file for subsequent processing or display. Images captured with photographic emulsion result in a series of invisible latent images on the film stock, which are chemically “developed” into a visible image. The images on the film stock are projected for viewing the same motion picture. Cinematography finds uses in many fields of science and business, as well as for entertainment purposes and mass communication.

Principal photography – Principal photography is the phase of producing a film or television show in which the bulk of shooting takes place, as distinct from the phases of pre-production and post-production.

Videography – Videography is the process of capturing moving images on electronic media (e.g., videotape, direct to disk recording, or solid state storage) and even streaming media. The term includes methods of video production and post-production. It used to be considered the video equivalent of cinematography (moving images recorded on film stock), but the advent of digital video recording in the late 20th century blurred the distinction between the two, as in both methods the intermediary mechanism became the same.

Shooting script – A shooting script is the version of a screenplay used during the production of a motion picture. Shooting scripts are distinct from spec scripts in that they make use of scene numbers (along with certain other formatting conventions described below), and they follow a well-defined set of procedures specifying how script revisions should be implemented and circulated.

Film inventory report – The Film Inventory Report or Daily Raw Stock Log is a filmmaking term for a report produced by the clapper loader each day. The report shows how much raw film stock was used that day, the number of good and no-good shots and the amount of film stock wasted.

Daily call sheet – Daily call sheet is a filmmaking term for the schedule supervised by the assistant director and crafted by the 2nd assistant director, using the director’s shot list, the production schedule and other logistics considerations. It is issued to the cast and crew of a film production to inform them of where and when they should report for a particular day of filming, usually no later than 12 hours before the start of the next work day.

Production report – A production report (“PR”) is a filmmaking term for the form filled out each day of production of a movie or television show to summarize what occurred that day. There is no standard template for a production report, and each show usually has an original template, often created before production begins by one of the assistant directors (“AD”). The purpose of this form is to keep track of a production’s progress and expenses and to help determine what salary is owed to the cast and crew. It is finally sent to studio executives and is permanently filed to serve as a legal record.

Daily production report – A daily production report (DPR) or production report (PR) in filmmaking is the form filled out each day of production for a movie or television show to summarize what occurred that day.

Daily progress report – A daily progress report is a filmmaking report that is produced at the end of each shooting day by the First Assistant Director (1AD) and passed to the Production Manager for approval. The daily progress report contains a record of what scenes were shot that day, the locations used, the number of meals served, the vehicles and equipment utilised and any other notable events or incidents.

Daily editor log

Sound report – A sound report is a filmmaking term for a sheet of paper created by the Sound Mixer to record details of each file recorded during filming. A sound report is arranged in a table format, where the rows represent each file recorded, which at the least would contain columns for noting down the scene, slate or shot and take number, and a wider column for remarks about the particular take’s sound. A report would typically note the title of the production, the date, the audio roll or tape that the file is recorded on, tape speed or sample rate, bit depth, and timecode information. More detailed reports may include the location, production company, director, the model of the mixer, recorder and microphones used on the day, the names of the sound crew, and columns indicating which tracks were used for any given take.

Cost report